Art as a life compass

Young, on the edge, and passionate. These three keywords characterize the collection of Dutch collector Frans Kasl, who believes that art is a great means to challenge the habitual thinking and ask questions about the paths we choose to follow. Why not seek other directions and turn left instead of right?

Name: Frans Kasl
Location: The Netherlands
Started collecting in year: 1987
Number of artworks in collection: About 100
Instagram: franskasl


How did you become an art collector?
It was not a single enlightening experience that led me to buy my very first piece. It started out as an interest for art at large. I started buying artbooks, going to museums, and galleries, and eventually it felt natural to bring the art itself into my life in a more physical sense.

How would you describe yourself as an art collector?
I am driven by curiosity for new artists and their ways of expressing their experience of the world in a visual language – be it the inner or the outer world. Truly, one of my main motivations behind my my collection is to support emerging artists and help them to bring their visual stories to life. I believe that art is a great means to challenge the habitual thinking and ask questions about the paths we choose to follow. Why not seek other directions and turn left instead of right? It most often brings about fruitful insights.

Describe your collection in three words.
Young, on the edge, passionate.


Katharina Grosse

Is there any particular type of art that appeals to you or anything that unites all the works in your collection?
I am particular preoccupied with abstract and minimal art, which takes me off the beaten path. Also, I buy more figurative artworks now and then, but the works are always characterized by some sort of an edge.

What do you enjoy the most: The hunt associated with collecting art or the joy of ownership?
I must say that I really enjoy the hunt. That being said, I really love being surrounded by my works every single day. Piece by piece, they add new layers to my own personal story – in art and in life in general.

What are the wishes for the future of your collection? What would you like to see happen to it?
I hope to keep on seeking out new ways of artistic expressions for another 30 years. My aim is to keep on supporting new art and young artists and do my best to make art a driving force in society.


Mounir Fatmi, Dan Rees & Magali Reus

What work of art do you wish you owned if the price tag did not matter?
That would be a Brice Marden painting – no doubt.

How do you know when you stand before a really great piece of art?
Seeing a really great piece of art is a very bodily and sensuous experience for me.  I get nervous or goosebumps and it sticks in my head like a song on repeat. Again and again and again, it shows up in my inner eye and reminds me of the power of art.

What is the best advice you have given or been given in terms of art collecting?
It is very basic, but oh so true: go to galleries and museums. Look and look again. The more you see the better.


Guido Geelen & Raphael Hefti
Installation view
Christopher Orr & Songe Luba statue from the beginning of the 20th century
Daniel Silver, Graham Hudson & Florian Schmidt
Michael Dean
Wolfgang Voegele